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Home » Forums » Forum Archives » Networking and Internet Sharing » Topic # 1142

Wrong IP addresses
NeoNux Aug-24-01 07:05 AM
I've got 2 PC's and two Laptops I'm trying to network.

OK at some point something went a bit screwy.

1 PC is running 98 and has automatically assigned a correct IP address of 192.168.0.x

However the others wich are all running WinME are persisting on giving me a funny IP like 168.x.x.x

When I tell them to be 192.168.0.x (x=whatever IP I choose at the time) it doesn't want to browse the network.
I have file sharing on and am using TCP/IP.

I try uninstalling then reinstalling the NIC's and TCP/IP but still no joy.

Any suggestions?


1. RE: Wrong IP addresses
lbyard Aug-24-01 09:50 AM
In response to message 0
What is automatically assigning an IP address? I do not see where you have anything installed (i.e., a DHCP server) that would do it. Are you sure those IPs are not in the range of 169.254.0.0-169.254.255.255?

MS KB Article ID: Q220874, Automatic Windows 98/Me TCP/IP Addressing Without a DHCP Server, http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q220/8/74.ASP?

“This article describes how to use Windows Me/98/2000 automatic Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) addressing without a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server being present on the network. Windows Me/98/2000 have a feature called Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA). With this feature, a Windows Me/98/2000 computer can assign itself an Internet Protocol (IP) address in the event that a DHCP server is not available or does not exist on the network. This feature makes configuring and supporting a small Local Area Network (LAN) running TCP/IP less difficult… The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) has reserved 169.254.0.0-169.254.255.255 for Automatic Private IP Addressing.”

How are the computers networked? What kind of cables and network adapters are you using? Larry


2. RE: Wrong IP addresses
NeoNux Aug-24-01 11:21 AM
In response to message 1
I don't know but I don't think there is a DHCP server. How can I tell if there is one?

The Computers all go through a hub. All the equipment is pretty standard D-Link PCMCIA cards for the laptops and Realtek PCI for the PC's.
The cabling is standard Cat5 UTP and the Network cards. NOT crossover.

The odd thing is that the Laptops saw eachother and one of the PC's on one day but the next the three WinME machines had changed IP addresses and could not see anything (Can not browse the network when you click on Entire Network).

Got me stumped.


3. RE: Wrong IP addresses
lbyard Aug-25-01 08:07 PM
In response to message 2
All of the computers have to be on the same TCP/IP subnet and have the same subnet mask (255.255.255.0) to network with TCP/IP. Be sure to install all of the protocols used on the network on the Windows Me computers. Windows Me may use only one of it’s installed the protocols to look for a Brows Master. Install NetBEUI in addition to TCP/IP if you have trouble with browsing and filet and printer sharing on the local network using TCP/IP. Larry

Q. How can I tell if a Dynamic Host Control Protocol Server is running/working on my network?

A. Windows 98 Resource Kit On Line, Chapter 15: “DHCP allows you to establish a range of valid IP addresses to be used per subnetwork <192.168.0.1, 192.168.0.2…192.168.0.254 comprise a subnetwork>. An individual IP address from the range is assigned dynamically to any DHCP client requesting an address. DHCP also allows you to establish a lease time that defines how long an IP address is to remain valid. Other configuration parameters can also be assigned using DHCP, such as subnet mask, DNS and WINS server identification, and so on.”
Windows 8X/Me: Click Start, Run, enter winipcfg, click the More Info >> button, select the appropriate network adapter, and see if there is anything in the DHCP Server box. Click release followed by renew to test the DHCP server.
Windows 2000 and NT (and probably Windows XP): Start, Run, enter cmd, and type the following in the resulting DOS window:
C:>ipconfig /all
Type:
C:>ipconfig /?
For additional ipconfig commands such as those used to release and renew the IP lease. Ipconfig also works with Windows 9X/Me.
Most Routers, Windows 98SE/Me/2000 Pro Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) have DHCP Servers.

Q. What is the Windows network Browse Service and what is a Browse Master?

A. The Microsoft networking browser system consists of a master browser, backup browsers, and client computers. The Windows browse service maintains a list, called the browse list, of computers with resources (servers--a client computer can also be a server in a peer-to-peer network) in a workgroup. One computer, the Browse Master, maintains the browse list. Users browse a network (browse list) to find, identify, and connect to network resources. Network resources are found by scrolling through a list of workgroups in the Network Neighborhood/My Network Places (workgroups are listed under the entire Network in Windows Me), a list of computers in a workgroup, and a list of shared resources on a computer. A computer can belong to only one workgroup and can only use resources in that workgroup. If a computer belongs to a Windows domain, both the domain and workgroup names must be identical. When a computer first starts Windows, it hunts for a Browse Master. An election is conducted if no Browse Master is found. An election is also conducted when a Master Browser disappears from the network (e.g., someone turns it off) or a Windows NT or 2000 Server starts. If the Browse Master function is enabled and one Windows NT or 2000 Sever that is the Primary Domain Controller is present, it becomes the Browse Master. If no domain controllers are present than the Master Browser is selected in the following priority order : Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows NT 4.0 Server Enterprise Edition, Windows NT 4.0 Server, Windows NT 4.0 Workstation, Windows 98/SE/Me, Windows 95, Windows for Workgroups 3.11. There is one Browse Master per network segment (a group of computers connected to an Ethernet hub are in the same network segment). A Browse Master will appoint computers with the Browse Master function enabled or set to automatic as a backup browse server for every 32 computers on a network segment. Secondary domain controllers on the same network segment with a primary domain controller become backup Browse Masters. The Browse Master sends a copy of the browse list to the backup browse servers every fifteen minutes . A client computer announces itself to the network based on what server services it is running. A Windows computer will not appear in a browse list if it is not running File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks. It may take up to 15 minutes for a computer to be added to the browse list. It may take up to 51 minutes (this number varies with different MS references and the process is complex) for a computer to be removed from a browse list after it has stopped announcing its presence.
To browse across TCP/IP subnetworks at least one Windows NT or 2000 Server Browse Master must be on each subnetwork. Microsoft networks using the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol (NWLink), have only one master browser for each domain and name queries are sent across routers in such a network automatically. For more Info see the Windows 98/98SE Resource Kit (http://duxcw.com/faq/network/helpdoc.htm); Browsing and Windows 95 Networking (Parts 1-3) (http://msdn.microsoft.com/archive/default.asp?url=/ARCHIVE/en-us/dnarwnet/html/msdn_browse1.asp); MS KB Article Q238853, Cannot Browse Network Neighborhood if PDC Is on Separate Subnet (http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q238/8/53.ASP?); and MS KB Article Q188001, Description of the Microsoft Computer Browser Service (http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q188/0/01.ASP?).

In my humble opinion this system does not always work well and needs a major overhaul. I have read that Windows XP fixes a lot of what is wrong, but I am presently skeptical.


4. RE: Wrong IP addresses
NeoNux Aug-26-01 00:48 AM
In response to message 3
Now I installed NetBEUI and I can map the drives but ONLY if I browse the network from Windows Explorer. If I try Network Neighbourhood(98) or My Network Places(ME) on the desktop none of the machines see the workgroup or can browse the network.

Its really starting to bug me. However now is my big hurdle. ICS. I can't get ICS to work from other machines now. There is something wrong me suspects in the registry.


5. RE: Wrong IP addresses
lbyard Aug-26-01 08:39 AM
In response to message 4
You did not say that you had ICS installed. If it is installed and working, you have a DHCP server--unless you deactivate it, which is not easy to do unless you have Allan McComb's ICSConfig (http://lynx.dac.neu.edu/a/amccombs/). The shares on other PCs appear under the Entire Network, <workgroup name> in Windows Me and not directly under My Network Places.

Getting back to ICS… Unless attempts have been made to tweak the TCP parameters, you shouldn’t have to do anything with the Windows registry. ICS is not going to work until all of the computers are able to communicate with the ICS host and obtain an IP address from its DHCP server (or you deactivate the ICS DHCP server and assign static IPs to the clients (192.168.0.2, 192.168.0.3, etc, but I would suggest using dynamic IPs until the system works). Are you turning the host on first and waiting for it to boot-up? Be sure the clients are configured for a gateway to the ICS host (192.168.0.1). Once that is solved, try opening a DOS window on the clients and pinging the ICS host:

C:\>ping 192.168.0.1

If that works, ping 216.92.56.121. If that works, browse to http://216.92.56.121. If that works, browse to http://duxcw.com/. If that doesn’t work there is a DNS configuration problem. I would definitely purchase a router if I had a four-PC network. Larry


6. RE: Wrong IP addresses
NeoNux Aug-27-01 12:12 PM
In response to message 5
Could you explain please the difference between a hub, switching hub and a router?

7. RE: Wrong IP addresses
lbyard Aug-27-01 03:18 PM
In response to message 6
Look in our networking and Internet Connection Sharing FAQs. The answers are there. Larry

8. RE: Wrong IP addresses
NeoNux Aug-27-01 11:33 PM
In response to message 7
Solved one problem... now have another.

OK I installed NETBEUI and that didn't work quite right... ie couldn't see the workgroup in Entire Network... Tried all sorts of things and was driving me mad. Finally I fixed it by the simplest of methods. Renamed the Workgroup from OEMWorkgroup to just Workgroup and away it went.

Anyway the new problem is that everytime I install ICS it kills internet access on the host computer (let alone let any other computer talk to the internet!).

Then I remove ICS and it still has the same symptoms!

I had to take out TCP/IP and reinstall it to get back some normal behavour.

I'm this close to using Linux.. hehe if only they didn't need those blasted Windows programs.


11. RE: Wrong IP addresses
lbyard Aug-28-01 05:38 AM
In response to message 8
Good... I've seen that one before (changing or rentering workgroup names). I just looked over all of your posts. How are you connecting to the Internet... dial-up, cable, or DSL? Larry

12. RE: Wrong IP addresses
NeoNux Aug-28-01 06:11 AM
In response to message 11
DSL connection... ADSL to be precise. On a 3Com HomeConnect internal PCI modem. If thats any help.

I have found that I have to also reset up the Dial Up connection (ie go into Dial Up connection and make a new connection then delete the old connection).


13. RE: Wrong IP addresses
lbyard Aug-28-01 03:40 PM
In response to message 12
If you have the 3CP3617 MODEM, suggest downloading and installing the latest software from 3COM at http://www.3com.com/products/en_US/detail.jsp?tab=support&pathtype=support&sku=3CP3617B. It is dated 21Jun2001. I have reason to believe from what little documentation is available that ICS is supposed to be installed and configured with the 3COM Homeclick/HomeConnect software, but I cannot verify that without installing the MODEM and the help files.

MS KB Article ID: Q243675, Description of Microsoft HomeClick Network Software, at http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q243/6/75.ASP?

MS KB Article ID: Q275739, Network Profiles Utility Included in HomeClick Software, at http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q275/7/39.ASP?

Larry


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